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The Mensa Bulletin

The Mensa Bulletin is the national magazine for members of American Mensa, published 10 times a year with combined issues in April/May and November/December. Our membership dues include a subscription to the Bulletin.

In addition to the member-generated content and photos, each issue includes a “question of the month” in which we ask members to share their thoughts (in 250 words or less) about a general-interest topic like “What invention would you want to cease to exist?” We’re posing these questions and more to Mensans — they don’t have to be professional writers to contribute, but they do have to be members of Mensa.

Mensa Bulletin cover

Current members: Access the latest issue of the digital Bulletin.

If you have a business you want to promote to Mensa members, why not advertise in the Mensa Bulletin? If you’re a Mensa member, you’ll receive 30% off the advertising rates. Learn more about advertising with American Mensa.

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What’s the Mensa Bulletin all about?

Here is an idea of some of our monthly content and a sample of the articles you can expect:

The Agony and the Ecstasy of Co-authoring a Novel

Distinct writing styles and clashing egos. A fallout between childhood friends. Editors who couldn’t see past rose-tinted glasses. Bestseller Nelson DeMille swore off writing collabs for decades until finally teaming up with his son, which, he says, brought the two closer together.

By Nelson DeMille
Western Religions’ Influence on Piratical Endeavors During the Golden Age of Piracy

Greed or necessity often motivated piracy, while politics have influenced the warfaring of privateering. But like politics and economics, religion was inextricably linked to its deep history.

By Joseph Mogel
Transmogrify

A lifetime of laughter bloomed spiderwebs in the corners of Edna’s eyes, but with time her world had grown dull and colorless. Suddenly, however, she’s given license to cut loose and paint the town red.

By Abigail Rose Manis • Illustrated by Amanda Mattison
A Tale of Two Authors

A mutual love of history brought these M’s together to discuss their new novels that explore from different perspectives the story of Jacoba/Giacoma dei Settesoli, a rich Roman noble who shares the crypt of St. Francis of Assisi.

By Susan Watts and Tinney Sue Heath
The Brahmanization of the American Lexicon

Americans might not know it, but their language — the lexicon of the everyday spoken and written word — is changing, a product of America’s diverse ethnicities and large immigrant populations.

By Vinod Jain
Too Darn Smart

The truth is, my son was a lot smarter than I was, and you could see that coming before he started to walk or talk. Little did I know that Mike's smarts would get him into a world of trouble.

By Tom Bixby • Illustrations by Linda Hensley
Says You! — A Mensa-worthy Romance

If you’re like me, it gets harder and harder to find the kind of creative, ingenious puzzles that challenge your imagination and mental agility. That changed when I fell in love with a radio show. And what happened when it loved me back changed my life.

By Linda Ferrazzara
The Interplanetary Marshmallow Test

Putting humans in space isn’t about exploration or national pride; it isn’t even about science. It’s about survival. A species that can look past short-term costs to the long-term benefit wins. It wins in the only way the universe cares — by staying alive.

By Paul McKinley
Inside the Network Neuroscience Theory of Human Intelligence

Like the brain, studying human intelligence can be curious, particularly when it comes to correlating quantitative measurements with specific biological factors. That is what makes so impressive the research of Dr. Aron K. Barbey, winner of the 2019 Mensa Foundation Prize.

By Chip Taulbee
Un-Conventional

A constitutional convention held today would be a prime target for influence by those who harbor ambitions of becoming American royalty, running the nation like a feudal kingdom, and further reducing or eliminating the ability of We the People to influence government.

By Lee Helms
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