The Mensa Bulletin

The Mensa Bulletin is the national magazine for members of American Mensa, published 10 times a year with combined issues in April/May and November/December. Our membership dues include a subscription to the Bulletin.

In addition to the member-generated content and photos, each issue includes a "question of the month" in which we ask members to share their thoughts (in 250 words or less) about a general-interest topic like "What invention would you want to cease to exist?" We're posing these questions and more to Mensans — they don't have to be professional writers to contribute, but they do have to be members of Mensa.

Mensa Bulletin cover
Current members: Access the latest issue of the digital Bulletin.

If you have a business you want to promote to Mensa members, why not advertise in the Mensa Bulletin? If you're a Mensa member, you'll receive 30% off the advertisting rates. Contact Bulletin Advertising for more information.

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What's the Mensa Bulletin all about?

Here is an idea of some of our monthly content and a sample of the articles you can expect:

If you feel like the pace of life is speeding up, that news, information and new technologies are moving faster and faster, you’re not alone. A new global survey on financial, political and social issues reveals future-shaping divides.

From Modafinil and similar nootropics to gene editing and brain-computer interfaces — will our seemingly endless quest for neuroenhancement forever end in "Flowers for Algernon"?

You are more likely to be struck by lightning than you are to make the finals of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Staggering odds, sure, but my student beat them more than once.

Michael felt the bourbon glaze numb his face as it always had after… how many? He stopped counting years ago, in the days when the high was a little higher and the morning climb back to reality not so treacherous.

How will the development of affective computing and artificial emotional intelligence transform our relationship with technology?

The annual Potluck Exhibit Social was Mrs. Rose Marie Charlotte Pelman's time to shine. But for her husband, Roy? Not so much.